Guide: The Healthiest Foods of All Time (with Recipes) – Lentils

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Lentils

lentil

 

Why they’re good for you: Even if you’re not a bean fan, give lentils a try. They’re easy to make, require no soaking and appear in a slew of colors. They also don’t have sulfur, the gas-producing component in other legumes. Lentils may be small, but they’re full of iron, fiber and protein.

How to eat them: Great in soups, in veggie burgers or as salad toppings

Serving size: ½ cup cooked

Calories: 115

Recipe: Red-Lentil Stew with Root Vegetables
Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients
1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 medium parsnips, sliced
2 medium carrots, sliced
3 stalks celery, sliced
1 medium onion, sliced
1 medium potato, peeled and diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ teaspoon low-sodium herbal seasoning blend (such as Mrs. Dash)
½ teaspoon smoked paprika
1 teaspoon thyme
2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
4 cups water
1 ½ cups red lentils, dried

Heat olive oil in a large pot. Add vegetables, garlic and seasonings and sauté for about 10 minutes. Add broth, water and lentils. Cover pot and cook for about 20 minutes, until vegetables and lentils are tender. Try serving as a light lunch with a salad and rustic whole-grain bread or for dinner with whole grains such as barley, farro or quinoa on the side.

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 278
Carbohydrates: 50 g
Protein: 14 g
Fat: 4 g
Sodium: 60 mg
Fiber: 10 g

Recipe from Sharon Palmer, R.D., author of The Plant-Powered Diet

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